RICHARD L. W. CLARKE


 

 

 

LITS2306 HISTORY OF CRITICISM

2019-2020

MODULE TWO: THE FOUR POLES OF LITERARY CRITICISM

 

WEEK SEVEN: THE MIMETIC POLE I: LITERARY REALISM AND NATURALISM
(Week of October 14)
 

REQUIRED READINGS:

 

 

SEMINAR 1: Notes:
TUTORIAL:
  • Questions on Rhetoric and Skepticism
  • See questions on Sophists Plato, Aristotle's Rhetoric and Sextus Empiricus (all in Module 1)
SEMINAR 2:
  • Zola, The Experimental Novel Continued

Notes:

RECOMMENDED READINGS:

PHILWEB RESOURCES:

COMMENTS:
 
  • Please read the recommended readings above on your own.

WEEK EIGHT: THE MIMETIC POLE II: THE CRITIQUE OF REALISM AND NATURALISM
(Week of October 21)
 

REQUIRED READINGS:

 

 

SEMINAR 1:
  • Oscar Wilde, "The Decay of Lying" [1889] (pp. 657-670 in Adams)
Notes:
TUTORIAL:
  • Joint Essay Writing Seminar (with LITS2002)  (S7; 9 -11 am)
SEMINAR 2:
  • Wilde, "The Decay of Lying" Continued
Notes:

RECOMMENDED READINGS:

PHILWEB RESOURCES:

COMMENTS:
 

WEEK NINE: THE EXPRESSIVE POLE: HERMENEUTICS AND HISTORICISM
(Week of October 28)
 

REQUIRED READINGS:

 

 

LECTURE 1: Hermeneutics Notes:
TUTORIAL:
  • GROUP PRESENTATION 1: Reading as a Mimetic Critic: Mark McWatt's "Overseas Calls"
Notes:
LECTURE 3: Historicism Notes:

RECOMMENDED READINGS:

PHILWEB RESOURCES:

COMMENTS:
 
  • Please read the recommended readings above on your own.

WEEK TEN: THE OBJECTIVE POLE: MODERNISM AND NEW CRITICISM
(Week of November 04)
 

REQUIRED READINGS:

 

 

SEMINAR 1:
  • T. S. Eliot, "Tradition and the Individual Talent" [1917] (pp. 13-22 in his Selected Essays; pp. 37-44 in Selected Prose of T. S. Eliot, ed. Frank Kermode; also pp. 71-77 in 20th Century Literary Criticism, ed. David Lodge; pp. 761-764 in Adams; pp. 1092-1098 in Leitch)
Notes:
TUTORIAL:
  • GROUP PRESENTATION 2: Reading as an Expressive Critic: Mark McWatt's “Ana,” “Gull” and “Philip”
Notes:
SEMINAR 2:
  • John Crowe Ransom, "Criticism as Pure Speculation" [1941] (pp. 128-146 in his Selected Essays; pp. 874-883 in Adams)
  • W. K. Wimsatt and Monroe C. Beardsley,
    • "The Intentional Fallacy" [1946] (pp. 3-18 in Wimsatt's The Verbal Icon: Studies in the Meaning of Poetry; also pp. 945-952 in Adams; pp. 1374-1387 in Leitch)
    • "The Affective Fallacy" [1949] (pp. 21-39 in Wimsatt's The Verbal Icon: Studies in the Meaning of Poetry; pp. 345-359 in 20th Century Literary Criticism, ed. David Lodge; also pp. 952-959 in Adams; pp. 1387-1403 in Leitch)
  • Cleanth Brooks, "The Formalist Critics" [1951] (pp. 1366-1371 in Leitch)
Notes:

RECOMMENDED READINGS:

PHILWEB RESOURCES:

COMMENTS:
 
  • The Thursday seminar/lecture will be held in MSR2 for the rest of the semester.

WEEK ELEVEN: THE PRAGMATIC POLE I: OBJECTIVE INTERPRETATION
(Week of November 11)
 

REQUIRED READINGS:

 

 

SEMINAR 1:
  • Matthew Arnold:
Notes:
TUTORIAL:
  • GROUP PRESENTATION 3: Reading as an Objective Critic: Mark McWatt's “A Poem at Baramanni”
Notes:
SEMINAR 2: Notes:

RECOMMENDED READINGS:

PHILWEB RESOURCES:

COMMENTS:
 
  • Please read the recommended readings above on your own.
  • In the tutorial this week, Prof. Mark McWatt will be our guest.  PLEASE READ HIS POEMS CAREFULLY BEFORE COMING TO CLASS.  We shall debate (in the company of the poet responsible for these poems) whether A) we should read his poems with reference to the author (i.e. seeking to ascertain the poet's intention and whether or not his poems reveal anything about him) or B) whether we should ignore the author altogether and just focus on the form of the poems themselves.

WEEK TWELVE: THE PRAGMATIC POLE II: SUBJECTIVE INTERPRETATION
(Week of November 18)
 

REQUIRED READINGS:

 

 

SEMINAR 1:
  • Oscar Wilde, "The Critic as Artist" [1890]: Part I (pp. 900-912 in Leitch)
Notes:
TUTORIAL:
  • GROUP PRESENTATION 4: Reading as a Pragmatic Critic: Mark McWatt's “Untilled”
Notes:
SEMINAR 2: Notes:

RECOMMENDED READINGS:

  •  

PHILWEB RESOURCES:

COMMENTS:
 
  • Rosenblatt's Literature as Exploration offers an antithetical argument to Richards' Practical Criticism, the former arguably functioning as something of a critical response to the latter.  Richards believes that we can be objective when we read, the purpose of which is to discover the meaning which waits to be found in the text.  Rosenbaltt argues, by contrast, that reading is necessarily subjective.  Meaning is not something which one discovers but something which one attributes to the text and which bears your personal imprint as a reader (your identity, assumptions, biases, etc.)  There are, thus, as many meanings to a text as there are readers.  We will not be reading Rosenblatt in class but, if you wish, you can do so on your own. 

You should be preparing from this point onwards for the Final Exam, which is based on Module 2.

END OF MODULE TWO
 

This site was last updated: November 20, 2019

Please direct all queries
HERE

 

Philosophy's Other: Theory on the Web

↑ Grab this Headline Animator