RICHARD L. W. CLARKE


 

 

 

LITS2001 POETRY I: WYATT TO POPE
(FORMERLY E20A)
 

COURSE ARCHIVE

2006-2007

2005-2006

2004-2005

2003-2004
(Martin Alleyne)

Summer 2003
(Sam Soyer)

2002-2000

2001-2002

2000-2001

1998-1999

1997-1998

Past Exam Papers

Annual Class Photos

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THUMBNAIL DESCRIPTION

 

DETAILLED DESCRIPTION

In this course, students study a selection of the most important poetry produced during two of the earliest, historically significant clusters of Anglophone poetry: the Renaissance (c.1550-1660) and the Neo-Classical (c.1660-1785) periods of English literary history.  Students will study selections to be found in The Norton Anthology of Poetry (with a few additions here and there) by some of the following poets: 

Renaissance Poetry: Wyatt, Philip Sidney, Mary Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, Lady Mary Wroth, Herbert, Marvell, and Milton

Neo-Classical Poetry: Dryden, Pope, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, and Phyllis Wheatley

We will also take into consideration how writers of these periods viewed poetry and literature by examining such seminal theoretical statements as Sidney's "An Apology for Poetry" or Pope's "An Essay on Criticism" for the light which they shed upon the poetry.

Paying close attention to both its technical characteristics and themes, we will attempt always to understand the poetry in relation to the main socio-economic, political and ideological features of the socio-historical contexts (class, gender, empire, race, etc.) in which it was produced. Some of the most important factors that we will consider in this regard for their radical impact on European consciousness include: early European attempts to explore and colonise foreign lands, the transition from a feudal economy, etc.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

 

PREREQUISITES

A pass in LITS1001 Introduction to Poetry. 

ASSESSMENT

Seminar participation and / or presentation(s) and / or response(s): 10%

Term paper: 30%

Final examination: 60% (2 questions in 2 hours)

Please note that, whatever the final mark, students must pass at least one question in the final exam to pass any course in Literatures in English.  Failures of this sort are denoted by FE ('Failed Exam') on the grade slip.

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